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1001 Ogden Ave.
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Downers Grove, IL

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1717 North Naper Blvd
Suite 200
Naperville, IL

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Enjoying Thanksgiving Break With Your Visiting College Student

Thanksgiving break can be such a wonderful time for parents and their returning college students. While parents simply look forward to having their child at home, students cannot wait to catch up with friends, gorge on home cooking, and relax in the comforts of home. As you plan the visit, I encourage parents to expect changes in their student’s tastes, behaviors, and routines. It is important to keep in mind that your child has been living an independent life for…

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Fear and Loathing and the College Roommate

Your freshman year in college starts soon. New school. New home. New college roommate. If the thought of living with someone you don’t know seems uncomfortable, creepy even, you’re not alone.  I’ll bet your future college roommate feels the same way! Whether you utilize your college’s “roommate finder” resource or decide to room with a high school friend, sharing living space with another person can get complicated. With a roommate, you will have to navigate a new type of relationship without…

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Clinical Anxiety in Teens

  In my private psychotherapy practice, anxiety in teens is a common reason for seeking treatment. Some level of anxiety is a normal, albeit uncomfortable part of life. However, when your child’s level of anxiety and worry is excessive and begins to significantly impact their life--in school, at home, or with friends--it may be time to seek professional help to determine whether your teenager is struggling with clinical anxiety. What are some signs of anxiety? General Anxiety Disorder is defined…

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Is My Teenager Depressed? Recognizing the Symptoms of Depression in Teens

“I can’t tell if my teenager is just moody or if he is depressed. What’s the difference?”

In my private psychotherapy practice I get asked this question a lot by worried parents wondering about the dividing line between usual adolescent moodiness and clinical depression. It’s a good question.

College-Teenager-Depression

Teenagers can be very moody. They can also sometimes be downright surly. The pendulum swing between the emotional polarities of happy to sad may fluctuate rapidly. It’s only when the pendulum gets “stuck “ on sadness, and your teen’s feelings of hopelessness and helplessness interfere with his ability to succeed in school, enjoy family and friends, engage in life, that your teen may need some help in getting his pendulum moving again.

During their teenage years adolescents experience a good deal of mental and physical growth. According to researchers, the developing teen brain makes as many new connections as a newborn infant’s. We all know how much physical change occurs during the teen years. This growth of brain and body can be physically exhausting for teens. In fact, the average teen requires more sleep than a newborn baby. Emotional and psychological maturation also occur. All this growth and change helps the adolescent develop their sense of self, an identity.

It can be difficult for parents to see their “sweet little child” suddenly turn into a person they no longer recognize. Well, guess what, your child may not recognize herself either. It’s no wonder that your teenager may sit in her room alone for hours feeling confused and scared by her changing self. Add to this mix outside stressors such as grades, college, changing peer relationships, and leaving home. For the majority of adolescents, this too shall pass. However, if your child is among the 11% of teens experiencing symptoms of depression here are some signs to look for.

Sadness is the number one sign of depression. Along with sadness, notice any changing behavior in your teen. I found this helpful video on Be Smart Be Well.com, a health and wellness website, in which Ken Duckworth, MD, Medical Director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness lists five symptoms to look for in your teen. Have your child’s sleeping patterns changed; is your child no longer interested in interacting with friends; is your child using drugs or alcohol; does your child experience physical symptoms, such as headaches or stomachaches; is your child talking about harming himself?

Most importantly it’s crucial to keep in mind, as Dr. Duckworth points out in his video, depression in teens is real, and it is treatable.

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